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In the article “Who’s to Blame for Creating a Toxic Organizational Culture (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.”  Guthrie presents the position that as the leader, New Jersey Governor  Chris Christie was responsible for harboring an environment that led to  what was termed Bridgegate. Based upon what you have learned thus far  about leadership and organizational culture, do you support or refute  Guthrie’s position? Cite at least one source to support perspective.  Respond to at least two of your classmates’ posts.

REPLY TO EDWARDS DISCUSSION:

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I support Guthrie’s position on New Jersey governor Chris  Christie being responsible for bridge gate because he had to have some  type of awareness to the situation before it blew up through one his  advisors. “Staff authority consists of the right to advise, or give  advice. Functional authority is the right to direct but not to  discipline” (Baack, 2017, p. 11.1). Just like any person in a high  leadership position, they have a group of advisors that give them  recommendations on what to do or say in certain situations. The New  Jersey governor had to have known something about the corruption through  his staff.

In my opinion, he either chose to ignore the situation or he  told his advisors that it was their responsibility to fix the situation.  In regards to any leader, their toughest responsibility is to be the  speaker and address any issues, concerns, or apologies to the public. “They’re  shocked by the unethical or illegal conduct and righteously denounce  the perpetrators and their actions—all followed by swift firings or a  harsh scolding” (Guthrie, 2014). He simply showed false empathy to the  public and covered his laziness or nonchalant attitude towards the  corruption by firing people who worked underneath him.

While the staff members had some dealings with what happened, it was  the governor’s responsibility to oversee their day to day actions. To  save himself from getting fired, he terminated some of his staff members  which is not being a true leader. True leader who have taken blame for  the situation and stepped down from rankings.

References

Baack, D. (2017). Organizational behavior. [Electronic version]. Retrieved from https://ashford.content.edu (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.

Guthrie, D. (2014, Jan. 16). Who’s to blame for creating a toxic organizational culture? Forbes. Retrieved from https://www.forbes.com/sites/dougguthrie/2014/01/16/whos-to-blame-for-creating-a-toxic-organizational-culture/#c909d64335bd (Links to an external site.)

REPLY TO QUENTINS DISCUSSION:

 

Politics  is one of the most interesting aspects in this country and is filled  with controversy and corruptness. It is hard for me to sit here and  believe that Gov. Christie was not cognizant of the fact that Bridgegate  was not going to take place. Many are quick to lie and say this or that  to keep the blame off of them. This was a prime case of line authority  and top-down authority, which flows from the top to the bottom. Even if  he did not know, when he found out, what did he do or what could have  been done to counteract this threat to public safety. What I have  noticed among some politicians is that they are quick to say what they  are going to do when they get into office but we know that happens only a  few times. This is highly unethical and puts the trust of the people on  edge because we do not know who is really for the people. Guthrie  stated, “If you create a culture of lying, bullying and deceit, whether  or not you direct people to take those actions, your staff likely will  follow suit.” This reminds me of the game, “Simon says.” If the leader  does it then it is understood that the staff can do it as well.

In an effort to not be succumbed to this type of happening again,  leaders have to ask themselves what type of people they need around  them. Leaders are “more likely to be effective in achieving change or  finishing a project if your group includes a variety of personality  types: the ideas person, the visionary, the person who counsels caution,  the one who insists on thinking through every detail, the  completer-finisher” (Mason, 2006, p. 20). Leaders should always employ  those better than them.

Baack, D. (2017). Organizational behavior. [Electronic version]. Retrieved from https://ashford.content.edu

Guthrie, D. (2014, January 16). Who’s to blame for creating a toxic  organizational culture? Forbes. Retrieved from  http://www.forbes.com/sites/dougguthrie/2014/01/16/whos-to-blame-for-creating-a-toxic-organizational-culture/

Mason, C. (2006). Leadership. What makes a good leader? Primary Health Care, 16(10), 18-20.