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Hi Tammy. Thank you for submitting your Week 5 assignment on time, and for your note about taking your time. My evaluation of your Week 5 submission is based on the rubric criteria that follow. Please note my comments and suggestions in the table. The purple text indicates the rating that you received on the criterion and, if not PROFICIENT, indicates an area where improvement in your understanding is needed in order to move forward successfully. I am happy to provide whatever clarification you need to help you move forward, and/or if a phone conversation would be more helpful at this time, I generally have some availability during my Thursday afternoon office hours (3-5 pm PST), or by appointment M-W. Let me know how you would like to proceed. Ever onward! Dr. D
Length: One page with a complete learning goal, learning outcome, and at least two learning objectives
References: No references required, though any sources used should be cited and referenced using APA style
10 points possible
Total points earned = 4.5

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Academic level of your paper

Type of Paper

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How many pages is this assigment?

Criterion

Proficient (100%)

Needs Improvement (75%)

Not Evident (0%)

Comments

Summary of Learning Need

 (10%)

Summarizes learning need with thorough and accurate details, including any necessary revisions from instructor (1.0 point)

Summarizes the learning need, though details are insufficient or inaccurate; may not include necessary revisions from instructor (0.75 points)

Does not summarize learning need.

(0 points)

Tammy, the summary of your learning need does not clearly demonstrate your understanding of a learning need as a gap between the current and desired states of knowledge and skills. What are the specific knowledge and skills that the instructional solution you are designing will address for these students? I invite you to consider this excerpt from Brown and Green (2015, p. 90) one of the resources in your Week 5 resource list: “There is no point to creating any form of instruction without first setting goals for that instruction. The instructional intervention has to be designed to do something— to cause some change in the learner’s knowledge, skill, or attitude. Otherwise, it is nothing more than a toy, a collection of artifacts, or an aimless discussion or presentation.
Brown, Abbie H., and Timothy D. Green. The Essentials of Instructional Design: Connecting Fundamental Principles with Process and Practice, Third Edition, Routledge, 2015, p. 90. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/ncent-ebooks/detail.action?docID=3569720

What is the specific change that the instructional intervention you are designing will cause in the students’ knowledge and skills with respect to creating unique inspirational cards?

Summary of Learner Analysis (10%)

Summarizes learner analysis with thorough and accurate details, including any necessary revisions from instructor (1.0 point)

Summarizes learner analysis, though details are insufficient or inaccurate; may not include necessary revisions from instructor (0.75 points)

Does not summarize learner analysis

(0 points)

Ooops, this assignment prompt was not addressed in your paper. As I have suggested before, Tammy, there are resources available to you for strengthening your understanding about how to decode and understand the assignment prompts listed in each week’s assignment description. I strongly urge you to consider utilizing these resources. There is a thorough overview video of the ASC: https://screencast-o-matic.com/watch/cqn3Y00iId

You can also get free 1-1 coaching here: https://ncu.libguides.com/c.php?g=901477&p=6486925

Or….

Decoding the Assignment Prompts: Every Friday at 1:00 pm Pacific, the Academic Success Center offers a group coaching session on Decoding the Assignment Prompts. During the Decoding the Assignment Prompt session there is a discussion about the various verbs used in assignment prompts. After a robust discussion, students practice identifying the important information in a sample prompt and if time permits, develop an outline from the prompt. The Decoding the Assignment Prompt group sessions are designed:
• To help students assess the important components of assignments.
• To teach strategies for understanding the prompt (color-coding, highlighting, etc.).
• To model these strategies with student input during small group sessions.
• To create opportunities in small group sessions for students to practice strategies and processes in a safe environment.
Sign up for a session here: https://ncu.libguides.com/learnasc/groupsessions

Assignment Prompt Verbs: What do they mean? is a handout located in the Academic Success Center that explains the verbs that are used in the assignment prompts: https://ncu.libguides.com/writingresources/assignmentsuccess

Learning Goal

(20%)

Composes a broad statement about what learners should know, do, or feel based on identified learning need (2.0 points)

Composes a statement about what learners should know, do, or feel, though it is not clear how statement relates to identified learning need; statement may be too specific (1.50 points)

Does not compose learning goal (0 points)

The learning goal statement that you provided is not stated as a learning goal. It is a statement about what you are wanting to achieve as their instructor. You wrote, “The main learning goal is to ensure that the students are identifying their mistakes at an early stage, so they will be able to rectify them accordingly.” Here is an example of a goal statement stated correctly, “Goal: Students will recognize and value the behaviors of a healthy lifestyle.” Consider this excerpt from Brown and Green (2015, pp. 90-91): “Instructional goals and instructional objectives are different from each other. An instructional goal can be a general statement about the intention of the instruction. For example, “Students will become better writers” is an instructional goal. However, an instructional objective is usually much more specific about how and to what degree the instruction will affect the learners. Based on the goal “Students will become better writers,” one instructional objective might be: “Upon completing the lesson, students will produce a traditional five-point essay with a recognizable introductory paragraph that includes a thesis statement, three paragraphs supporting the thesis statement, and a concluding paragraph that restates the thesis.” An instructional goal can be used as an organizing topic for subordinate instructional objectives. For example, the instructional goal, “Students will recognize and value the behaviors of a healthy lifestyle,” might serve as the organizing topic for a number of specific instructional objectives (see Figure 6.1).”
Brown, Abbie H., and Timothy D. Green. The Essentials of Instructional Design : Connecting Fundamental Principles with Process and Practice, Third Edition, Routledge, 2015, pp. 90-91. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/ncent-ebooks/detail.action?docID=3569720.

Learning Outcome

(20%)

Composes intermediary statement about changes in learner thinking or performance with clear alignment to learning goal (2.0 points)

Composes intermediary statement about changes in learner thinking or performance, though outcome lacks clear alignment with learning goal (1.50 points)

Does not compose learning outcome (0 points)

Again, Tammy, the outcome statement that you provided lacks specificity. You wrote, “a learning outcome that I expect from the students is that all students will be able to come up with unique ideas for inspirational cards.” Consider this excerpt from Larson and Lockee (2019, p. 169): “Outcomes also serve to guide the instructional designer in planning, monitoring, evaluating, and improving all parts of the instruction (Brookhart & Moss, 2012). Since they specify what should come out of the learning experience, outcomes indicate how the learner will be assessed, and provide guidance on the strategies to use for the learning experience. As a result, the outcomes, assessments, and teaching/ learning strategies in your design should reflect each other or be aligned , so that they support the learner in mastering the required knowledge and skills. Outcomes also serve as a means of measuring the success of the instruction (or evaluating it), thus providing accountability for the designer.”
Larson, Miriam B., and Barbara B. Lockee. Streamlined ID : A Practical Guide to Instructional Design, Taylor & Francis Group, 2019, p. 169. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/ncent-ebooks/detail.action?docID=5990847.

Also, consider this excerpt from Larson and Lockee (2019, p. 170): “Defining learning outcomes is a refinement and continuation of the content analysis process described in Chapter 5, and the selection of a theoretical or pedagogical approach as described in Chapter 6. Here are a few basic tips on defining outcomes that can be customized for the type of content and the pedagogical approach you’ve chosen for your design: 1. Define the specificity or level of detail and the type of outcome . (See also the outcomes checklist at the end of this chapter – see Table 7.9 on p. 191.) 2. Write outcomes that clearly communicate expectations. 3. Align outcomes to assessments and strategies using a three-column table. 4. Plan how to communicate the outcomes and their relevance to learners.”
Larson, Miriam B., and Barbara B. Lockee. Streamlined ID : A Practical Guide to Instructional Design, Taylor & Francis Group, 2019, p. 170. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/ncent-ebooks/detail.action?docID=5990847

Following the basic tips provided in the second excerpt, how would you re-write your learning outcome statement(s) to align with these tips?

Learning Objectives

(30%)

Composes at least two statements about specific, discrete tasks that are clearly aligned with the learning outcome and goal (3.0 points)

Composes at least one statement about a learning task, though statement lacks specificity, includes more than one task, or is not clearly aligned with the learning outcome and goal (2.25 points)

Does not compose objectives (0 points)

Unfortunately, the statements you provided about learning objectives in your scenario do not conform with how learning objectives should be written within the context of instructional design. Consider these examples and excerpts and re-evaluate how you have written your learning objectives.

Goal: Students will recognize and value the behaviors of a healthy lifestyle.
Objective #1: Students will describe the differences between complex and simple carbohydrates.
Objective #2: Students will predict the consequences of including too many simple carbohydrates in one’s diet.
Objective #3: Students will create an appropriate exercise plan for themselves based on their personal requirements.
Objective #4: Students will produce a personal daily schedule that includes sufficient time for rest and recreation.
Figure 6.1 An example of an instructional goal and subordinate objectives. Notice that all the objective statements include active verbs (describe, predict, create, produce).
Brown, Abbie H., and Timothy D. Green. The Essentials of Instructional Design : Connecting Fundamental Principles with Process and Practice, Third Edition, Routledge, 2015, p. 91. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/ncent-ebooks/detail.action?docID=3569720.

The approach to developing learning objectives most often used by instructional designers was created by Robert Mager. Mager’s approach is designed to generate performance objectives and is inextricably connected to behavioristic instructional design applications. Mager recommends using three components in writing learning objectives: 1.) Action : Identify the action the learner will take when he or she has achieved the objective. 2.) Condition : Describe the relevant conditions under which the learner will act. 3.) Criterion : Specify how well the learner must perform the action. According to Mager, a learning objective is “a description of a performance you want learners to be able to exhibit before you consider them competent” (1984, p. 3). Brown, Abbie H., and Timothy D. Green. The Essentials of Instructional Design : Connecting Fundamental Principles with Process and Practice, Third Edition, Routledge, 2015, p. 92. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/ncent-ebooks/detail.action?docID=3569720.

For more about the Mager three-part format for writing effective learning objectives with examples, also see “The Mager Format” located online here: http://cehdclass.gmu.edu/ndabbagh/Resources/IDKB/objective_formats.htm#mager
Just as a goal is the intention of the instruction, an objective is the intended outcome of each instructional activity. The intended outcome can be described as what the learner will be able to do upon completing the instruction. Determining the intended outcome in advance is an important step in the design process if student success will ultimately be measured against some standard or specific evaluation criteria. Clearly stated instructional objectives also make it easier for a design team to produce instruction that meets with the approval of everyone involved.
Brown, Abbie H., and Timothy D. Green. The Essentials of Instructional Design : Connecting Fundamental Principles with Process and Practice, Third Edition, Routledge, 2015, p. 94. ProQuest Ebook Central, http://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/ncent-ebooks/detail.action?docID=3569720.

There are also a number of video resources on writing learning objectives that are provided in the News Item tool on the course home page. See the Assignment Tips for the Week 5 assignment. I recommend reviewing those as well.

Communication

 (10%)

Assignment has few, if any, errors related to organization, paragraph development, sentence structure, grammar, or spelling (1.0 points)

Assignment has errors related to organization, paragraph development, sentence structure, grammar, or spelling that slightly impact readability or understanding of ideas (0.75 points)

Assignment has errors that significantly impact understanding of ideas (0 points)

One suggestion I would offer is to use APA Style heading levels to structure and organize your paper. See this tutorial video: https://academicwriter-apa-org.proxy1.ncu.edu/6/learn/browse/QG-21. 

Score4.5 / 10 – F