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Patient Preferences and Decision Making

The health care setting exposes the medical professionals to individuals from all walks of life. A patient was presented in the emergency department complaining of chest pain, headache, buzzing in the ears, and fatigue. The nurse involved him in the assessment as well as formulation of the treatment or care plan. Moreover, the nurse discussed with him the diagnostic results, and together they created the care plan. Incorporation of the patient’s preferences and values significantly assisted the care provider to design the intervention for the condition. Because the patient was diagnosed with hypertension, the patient and the nurse agreed on a 30-mintute daily physical activity and healthy eating that consists of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. Engagement of the patient in the care plan increased his satisfaction towards the treatment and nurse.

The patient’s preferences and values substantially affected the course of the above scenario. Firstly, incorporating the values and preferences enhanced the quality of clinical intervention (Jolles, Richmond & Thomas, 2019).  The care provider was able to create a response which improved the patient health outcomes. Secondly, including the patient preferences and values increased compliance with the treatment plan, therefore, quicker healing (Kon et al., 2016). The patient was able to strictly follow the exercising schedule as well as the dietary guideline, which enhanced his recovery. Furthermore, the patient opportunely followed the prescribed medications as he was consulted before the prescription was handed over to him. Finally, as a result of incorporating patient values and preferences, the patient took long before coming back to the clinic. As such, incorporation of patient values and preferences reduced the rate of hospital readmissions.

The scenario used the Ottawa Family Decision Guide. The model was important as it helped both the patient and nurse to make both health and social decisions. It also helped the patient to make a decision on the next step concerning his health (The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 2019).  In my professional life, the toll will play an important role in guiding me to evaluate treatment options.

References

Jolles, M. P., Richmond, J., & Thomas, K. C. (2019). Minority patient preferences, barriers, and facilitators for shared decision-making with health care providers in the USA: a systematic review. Patient Education and Counseling102(7), 1251-1262.

Kon, A. A., Davidson, J. E., Morrison, W., Danis, M., & White, D. B. (2016). Shared decision making in intensive care units: An American College of Critical Care Medicine and American Thoracic Society policy statement. Critical Care Medicine, 44(1), 188–201. doi:10.1097/CCM.0000000000001396

The Ottawa Hospital Research Institute. (2019). Patient decision aids. Retrieved from https://decisionaid.ohri.ca/