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Sarah Igo considers the history of privacy in modern America, examining the complex rights and experiences associated with being “known.”  According to Igo, what do debates about privacy tell us about what it means to be a “modern citizen”? 

In chapter 8, Igo explores the history of what she calls “confession culture.” How does this history inform currents debates about privacy and why is it important see today’s privacy debates through a lens of changing cultural attitudes and expectations?