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The Internet has been called the world’s biggest library, but unlike library material, Internet material is not always subjected to rigorous editorial procedures. Never has the adage been more true than when applied to the Internet: “Don’t believe everything you read.” 

Choose a website and evaluate it according to the three criteria discussed in Chapter 7 for evaluating Internet sources. Be sure to provide a link to the site and include the criteria in your main post.

respond at least to two classmates

1. 

Internet Source: “Revealed: The Most Dangerous Places to Travel In 2020”

  1. Is the author of the document clearly identified?: Yes, her name is at the top of the article and her name is Laura Bloom
  2. If the author is identified, is he or she an expert on the topic?: She is listed as a senior contributor, but I don’t think that means she is an expert on the topic
  3. If the author is not an expert, can his or her opinions be accepted as objective and unbiased?: Her information is pulled from a different source called International SOS’s Travel Risk Map 
  4. If the author is not identified, can the sponsoring organization be determined?: The sponsoring organization is Forbes magazine.
  5. Does the sponsoring organization have a reputation for expertise and objectivity?: Forbes is an American business journal and it has a reputation for producing quality work in the past.
  6. Does the document include a copyright date, publication date, or date of last revision?: Yes, it was published November 18, 2019
  7. If a date is included, is the document recent enough to cite in my speech?: No, probably not. No one could predict how much the pandemic of 2020 has shaken and reshaped the map. Recent events have affected what places are the safest to visit in 2020, now 2021. 
    Website link: https://www.forbes.com/sites/laurabegleybloom/2019/11/18/travel-2020-most-dangerous-places-greatest-safety-risks/?sh=7cbec48c2196

2. 

Facts About Frogs & Toads

  1. Is the author of the document clearly identified?

Yes, her name is Alina Bradford. Her name is directly below the article title.

  1. If the author is identified, is he or she an expert on the topic?

I would assume that Alina is an expert as she has been reporting to Live Science for 16 years and has contributed numerous articles about wildlife, health, and other biological interests.

  1. If the author is not an expert, can his or her opinions be accepted as objective and unbiased?

All of her statements are objective and unbiased.

  1. If the author is not identified, can the sponsoring organization be determined?

Alina Bradford’s sponsor is Live Science magazine.

  1. Does the sponsoring organization have a reputation for expertise and objectivity?

I believe so as they are a science magazine.

  1. Does the document include a copyright date, publication date, or date of last revision?

It includes a publication date of May 1st, 2015.

  1. If a date is included, is the document recent enough to cite in my speech?

If I were to give a speech about frogs and toads, I would feel comfortable with referencing this article.

https://www.livescience.com/50692-frog-facts.html